Process and People

I want to keep a live record of the people helping and guiding me on my capstone project as I go on the journey of creating my children’s book. This post I will continue to update as there are new ideas and developments for my story.

Katie Herzig: Professor of psychology at Plymouth State University, specializing in children’s development. She had amazing insight about real life families teaching modern lessons to their children. She pointed me in the right direction of the demographic of children I should target the story with; a group that is young enough that the story is being read to them, but old enough that the lessons are understood.

Janette Wiggett: Plymouth State University TitleIX Coordinator. Provided insight about why communications about consent is important. She has been my mentor all year teaching me laws and language of sexual misconduct issues and really opened my eyes up to the important of messaging around this topic.

Tina: After meeting with Tina E from Voices Against Violence I had such a better idea of where this project was going. I am turning my children’s book in a marketing flipbook learning tool for children and adults.

https://www.gse.harvard.edu/news/uk/18/12/consent-every-age is a website that talks about how to teach consent at every age.

  • Develop a shared vocabulary
  • Lay the social-emotional groundwork
  • Teach kids that it’s OK to express hurt
  • Model consent and empower student

Reference Books:

Sanders, Jayneen, and Cherie Zamazing. No Means No!: Teaching Children about Personal Boundaries, Respect and Consent; Empowering Kids by Respecting Their Choices and Their Right to Say, No! Educate2Empower Publishing, an Imprint of UpLoad Publishing, 2018.

Kurtzman-Counter, Samantha, and Abbie Schiller. Miles Is the Boss of His Body. Mother Co., 2014.

Working intro page:

Ask, Listen, and Respect is a multifunctional book for you and your child or student. Fold the book in reverse, extend inner tabs, and prop it up on its new side to create the flip book look. On the front, there is an empowering story for your child with the textual context for the parent or teacher on the back! 

Ask, Listen, and Respect is a teaching tool I designed for children ages 4-10 years old and an adult to create a mindset of asking permission, listening to the response, and respecting the choice.  

Asking is a great way to find something out like…  

“Do you want to come over and play?”  

Listening is how you learn the answer to what you asked…  

“I cannot come over to play. I am going to my cousin’s house.”  

Respecting is important to show that you care about their feelings and the right to say yes or no..  

“That is okay, maybe another time, have fun at your cousin’s house!”  

Practicing these three steps is an effective habit for children to develop at a young age. This book not only empowers children to respect others, but also supports children to speak up about their comfort levels. This teaching tool educates parent/guardians, teachers, and professionals on the importance of listening and accepting children’s decisions. When children’s choices are validated by those around them, they can be more confident and comfortable in discussions about how they feel. As children grow up, this reinforced habit can carry over into personal and professional relationships to build a strong and healthy foundation for communication about consent.  

Original sketches of characters
Coloring the characters

There is a huge importance of the style of character because it contributes to the tone of the story, reliability from the audience to the character, and visual engagement. I studied many cartoon styles and their type of story they were from.

These are popular characters that children from the age demographic I was targeting watch or have seen. To the right is the same character draw in many different styles.

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